Hoping you are having as much fun with our egg series as we are.  We have talked about scrambling and soft boiling, and now we are going to share how we make Perfect Hard-Boiled Eggs.

Perfect Hard Boiled Eggs

I hate when I boil an egg with intentions of hard-boiling it and it cracks, the white oozes out or the yolk turns grey.  One would think, that it would be easy to “hard boil” an egg but it isn’t;  until now!  I have tried this method on and off for the past few months and it has not failed me yet.

Follow these tips and you will have the Perfect Hardboiled Egg:  

1) Use eggs that are about a week old.  I don’t like to use eggs more than a couple of weeks old because I have a thing with old food.  

2) Make sure the eggs are at room temperature (at least an hour, not longer than 2 hours, per the USDA) this will prevent cracking.

3) Put the eggs in a single layer, not all stacked upon each other, in the saucepan, again, to prevent cracking.  Cover with cold water.

4)  Not sure why but when we add vinegar to the mix, the eggs peel better.

5) When the water hits a full boil, turn off the heat, cover the pan and remove it from the stove.  Then forget about them for a little while. 

6) Once finished cooking, submerge the eggs in icy cold water.

7) Peeling – gently roll back and forth on the counter to release the shell from the egg.  I try to grab a portion of the thin membrane under the shell and then gently peel.

 

Perfect Hard-Boiled Eggs

Ingredients:

6 large eggs, at room temperature

1 tablespoon cider vinegar

How To:

Place the eggs into a saucepan and cover with cold water, add vinegar.

Bring to a gentle boil.  Cover with a lid and remove the heat.

Let sit for 10 minutes.

Submerge the eggs in a bowl of icy cold water.

Peel the eggs.

Use immediately or put into the fridge to use later.

** take precautions when serving eggs by making sure deviled eggs, as well as egg salad, is chilled if not eating immediately.  Do not eat if it has been sitting out in the open for more than an hour, especially in the summer months.

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